WinCraps


WinCraps™ Frequently Asked Questions


Question #1

I'm interested in playing WinCraps. How do I get started?

Answer

First, you'll need a copy of the game software. If you don't already have a copy then click here to download the latest version of WinCraps. The file you'll download is a single file named WINCRAPS.EXE which is actually a collection of many files that have all been compressed together into one self-extracting zip file.

To install the game, simply run WINCRAPS.EXE. You can do this by clicking your Windows Start button, then choosing "Run", and entering the path and file name of WINCRAPS.EXE. For instance, if you downloaded WINCRAPS.EXE into your TEMP folder, you would enter C:\TEMP\WINCRAPS.EXE Another option is to open your Explorer and double-click on WINCRAPS.EXE.

A small window with three buttons will appear. Press the one marked "Setup" to proceed. This will cause the game files to be extracted to a temporary folder. You'll then be presented with opportunities to select a permanent folder as well as create shortcuts. The default folder is C:\WinCraps but you can select another or create a new one if you like.

All of WinCraps' files are copied to the single folder which you specify. There are no hidden files and no changes to your system registry or configuration. When installation is complete (or if you should cancel installation) the temporary files and folder will be deleted.

If you're unable to install WinCraps using the automated installation program, you can manually extract WinCraps' game files from WINCRAPS.EXE using any standard zip program. In this event, if you're installing WinCraps into the same location as an earlier version of WinCraps, be sure to overwrite all files.

To run WinCraps, simply invoke the game from the desktop or program menu shortcut if one was created during installation. If shortcuts were not created during installation then you must locate and run the file WinCrapsPro20e.EXE. You'll find this file in the folder you specified during installation.

  • Click the "Start" button on your taskbar
  • Select "Run"
  • Enter the path to the location of the game file. For example, C:\WINCRAPS\WinCrapsPro20e.EXE

Note: If you're installing an earlier version you'll need to look in the game folder to find the executable game file name and use that. For instance, to run classic version 5.1c you'd enter C:\WINCRAPS\WC51C.EXE

To uninstall WinCraps, simply delete the folder containing WinCraps' game files.




Question #2

After installing WinCraps, I dragged the game's executable file to my desktop. But when I try to run the game I get something that says "runtime error". What's with this?

Answer

This error should only appear with the classic or older versions (the pro version should just show a warning). By dragging the main game file to the desktop, you isolated it from its needed support files. You should keep all of WinCraps original files together in the same folder. (New files that you create such as Auto-bet and Dice Roll files can be located anywhere.) The same is true for shortcuts. Any shortcut you create needs to start in the folder containing the main game file as well as its support files.

The easiest way to create a shortcut is:

    1) Using your explorer, open the folder containing WinCraps' files (this would be C:\WinCraps unless you changed it)
    2) Right-click the main game file WinCrapsPro20e.EXE. A menu will appear.
    3) Select SEND TO. A second menu will appear.
    4) Select DESKTOP (Create shortcut)

An alternate way of creating a shortcut is:

    1) Right-click your mouse pointer while pointing over an open space on your screen (desktop). A small menu will appear.
    2) Select NEW from the menu. A second menu will appear.
    3) Select SHORTCUT. A "Create Shortcut" box will appear.
    4) In the location box enter C:\WINCRAPS\WinCrapsPro20e.EXE (unless you installed WinCraps into a different folder. In that case enter the folder you used or find it with the BROWSE button.)
    5) Click NEXT
    6) Enter a name for your shortcut such as "WinCraps"
    7) Click FINISH

A shortcut will then appear on your desktop. Just double-click it to start the game.




Question #3

WinCraps has been properly installed on my computer but some strange things happened inside the game when I ran it. Any ideas?

Answer

Most likely the game's default save file has become corrupted. This is easily corrected by exiting the game and deleting the file DEFAULT.CRP from your WinCraps folder. This is in effect a "master reset" and will result in all the game features reverting to their original WinCraps settings.




Question #4

Will WinCraps run on Windows XP, Vista, 7, 8, or 10?

Answer

Yes. However, if you're running any of the classic versions earlier than version 5.1 you'll need to download a file called WINHLP32.EXE if you want to be able to run WinCraps' help file. Microsoft decided not to support their older help file format and no longer includes WINHLP32.EXE with newer operating systems. Although Microsoft does not allow developers to redistribute WINHLP32.EXE they do allow users to download it free of charge from the following site: go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=82148




Question #5

Will older versions of WinCraps run on Windows XP, Vista, 7, 8, or 10?

Answer

Yes. However, if you're running version 4.7d or earlier and if you should experience any problems, you may need to do this: Open your Windows Explorer to the WinCraps folder. Right click on the main game file (for instance, the main game file for version 4.7d is WC47D.EXE), choose Properties, and then click the Compatibility tab. Check "Run this program in compatibility mode for", and select the Windows 95 version. Also see question #4.




Question #6

Will WinCraps run on my Mac?

Answer

Yes. Although WinCraps is written for Windows, many folks are running it on their Macs using Windows emulation software such as Parallels or VMware Fusion.




Question #7

WinCraps seems to be running very slow. Is there anything I can do about it?

Answer

Here are a few possibilities:

1) Check the volume. If you have the game sounds turned on but your volume is turned down, then what seems to be a delay is actually the game attempting to play the sounds. In most cases your volume can be controlled from the Sound tab on WinCraps' Configuration screen.

2) If you're using auto-rolling (not the hyper-drive) check the auto-roll time delay. In the Classic version, the time delay is found on the right side of the Auto-play screen. In the Pro version, it's found on the Options menu of the Bankroll screen or the menu of the "Roll Your Own Numbers" pad (right-click over the pad to raise the menu.)

3) Another possibility is that you have too many statistics screens open. Each open statistics screen consumes an extra bit of time because it's actively updated as the game runs.

4) If you're running the hyper-drive, check to make sure that you've turned off the events log recorder (Select Statistics - Events Log - Options and uncheck Record Events) The events log slows down the hyper-drive because it takes time to write selected data to your hard drive.




Question #8

Is there a way to automatically play the same rolls over again so I can compare different methods?

Answer

Yes, absolutely! You can repeat the rolls played using either of two methods:

1) Provide a seed to the random number generator and re-enter that same seed each time you want to play the same rolls. See RNG in the help file or on the Misc tab of the Configuration screen.

2) Record a dice roll file and replay the file when desired. Select "Dice Roll Files" from the Action menu or find it in the help file.




Question #9

Can you recommend a good system to play?

Answer

That depends on what you define as "good". We all have our own desires, goals, limitations, and expectations. How much risk do you want to take? How long do you want to play? How much are you willing to spend? Will you accept small wins or would you like to shoot for the moon? What may be a good system for someone else may be completely wrong for you. Therefore, the only one who can really decide what's a good system, is you.

In order to develop and/or evaluate your system, you're going to need to practice with it. But do you really want to do that in a casino with your hard-earned cash at stake? Hardly. Save yourself a lot of time, energy, aggravation, and MONEY by practicing on WinCraps first. Although nothing (including WinCraps) can guarantee what your outcome will be on your next outing, with enough practice you should develop a feel for the kind of action you might expect to see.

An important thing to remember regarding systems is that those utilizing bets with lower house advantages will on average lose less than those utilizing bets with higher house advantages. For instance, a system that plays the Hard 10 will ON AVERAGE lose more than a system playing an equivalent amount of action on the Passline. A table of house advantages can be found in WinCraps' help file.




Question #10

How can I get the bankroll indicator to reset so I can start over?

Answer

Select "New" under the Game menu to reset the table. Your initial bankroll will be determined by the settings on the Bankroll tab of the Configuration screen. The Configuration screen is also found under the Game menu. If you don't want to start a completely new game/session, you can make bankroll adjustments through an ATM on the bankroll tab.




Question #11

How do I play an auto-bet file?

Answer

First you need to open the auto-bet file as follows:

1) Start WinCraps
2) Click on the "Action" menu and select "Auto-Bet" (the auto-bet screen will appear)
3) Click on the "File" menu and select "Open" (a file list box will appear)
4) Select an auto-bet file from the list, then click on "OK". (If desired, you can double click on entries to select them. For instance, to change folders, double-click an entry in the folders box).

The file will load and appear on the auto-bet screen. You can edit any of lines if you like. To play the file, click on the box marked "Active", then return to the game table and begin rolling.




Question #12

I'm trying to write some auto-bets in WinCraps Classic but I can't get the game to log any of the lines I make. Can you advise?

Answer

To log an auto-bet, first modify the type of line that you want (Condition, Action, etc.), then click on the command button next to the line. For instance, to log a condition line, click on the button to the far left marked "Condition". When you do, the condition line will turn red and the mouse-pointer will change. Next click inside the large logged bets box at the point where you want the line to appear. Voila!




Question #13

How can I use auto-bet to bet all the Place bets except for the point?

Answer

There are many ways to do this depending on what you want to do. In WinCraps Classic, the easiest would be something like this:

Do this ...
        Bet $ 5 on all Place bets
        Bet $ 0 on Place (shooter's point)

This will keep all Place bets except the point covered at all times and for the same amount (note: with the auto-adjust bet amounts feature activated, the $5 Place bets on 6 and 8 will automatically change to $6.) However, if your intent is to allow winning bets to be pressed up then you shouldn't use a blanket statement to make the bets. In this case, you only want to make bets where the existing Place bets are zero so you need to address each bet individually, something like this:

While ...
        Place 4 is equal to $ 0
then ...
        Bet $ 5 on Place 4
While ...
        Place 5 is equal to $ 0
then ...
        Bet $ 5 on Place 5
... repeat for 6, 8, 9, and 10 ...
Do this ...
        Bet $ 0 on Place (shooter's point)

In WinCraps Pro you could just write:

Bet $5 on all(=0, Place bets) :
Remove Place(point)

This will preserve pressed amounts except where new points are established. However, sometimes people who play Place bets want to preserve the amounts from new point numbers and transfer them to open Place bets. For instance, say the point is 6 and the Place 8 had been pressed up to $30. The shooter makes the 6 and then establishes a new point of 8. The Place 6 now needs a bet and the Place 8 needs to come down. The solution is to transfer the $30 on the Place 8 to the Place 6. In fact this is usually what the dealer will ask if you'd like to do. In some cases you'll need to add or remove a small amount to properly size the new bet. For instance, if a $10 Place 9 bet is transferred to the Place 8, the dealer will ask you to throw in $2 to make it a $12 bet. If you'd like to play this way, you can use an auto-bet file called place bet point xfer to do it for you.




Question #14

I'd like to make a Place 6 or 8 bet for less than $6, but each time I try, the program changes it to $6. The same thing happens when I try to make Place 4,5,9,or 10 bets for less than $5. Is there a setting to allow me to do this?

Answer

Yes, absolutely! Navigate to the Auto-play screen (found on the Action menu) and select "manual" on the "Auto-adjust bet amounts" feature. With "manual" selected, the game will allow you to bet any amount you want (as long as it's not less than the minimum bet or more than the maximum bet set on the Configuration screen). With either of the auto options selected, the game will automatically adjust any amount you bet to an amount that squares with the odds.




Question #15

Can I move checks from one bet to another?

Answer

Yes, you can move checks from one bet to another by dragging and dropping them. Just point at the checks and hold down the Alt key, then click-and-hold the left mouse button and move the mouse-pointer to where you want the checks to go. Finally, release the mouse button and voila! - your checks will be moved to the new location. The dropped checks will be treated the same as if you had placed them there normally and are therefore subject to any options you have selected such as Auto-Adjusting bet amounts. If you drop your checks over an area where checks are not allowed, they are simply removed from the table.




Question #16

At the casino I heard a dealer ask someone if he wanted to come "Down with odds". What does that mean and can I set WinCraps up to simulate it?

Answer

When you have a Passline or Come bet which becomes established on a point number where you already have a Place bet, the dealer will ask if you'd like to come "Down with odds." It means to take down the Place bet and use the money to take odds on your newly established Passline or Come bet. Using the Auto-Play screen, you can set WinCraps up to give you "Down with odds" as follows:

In WinCraps Classic, check both the "Auto-Take Full Odds" and "Auto-Remove Place Bets" boxes.

In WinCraps Pro, select the desired player(s), then check both the "Auto-Take Full Odds" and "Auto-Down Place Bets" boxes.




Question #17

How do I collect random data from random.org and use it to create a roll file to play on WinCraps?

Answer

To collect the data:

  • Navigate to http://random.org/
  • At the top of the page click on "Numbers"
  • Select "Integers" from the list that appears
  • Click on the button titled, "Switch to Advanced Mode"
  • Fill out the form with how many numbers you want. There's a max of 10,000 per request which would equal 5000 dice rolls.
  • Enter "1" for the lowest value and "6" for the highest value.
  • Enter any number of columns.
  • Where it says "Choose Numeral System" select "Decimal (base 10)"
  • Where it says "Choose Output Format" select "Bare-bones text document."
  • Where it says "Choose Randomization" select "Generate your own personal randomization."
  • When you get the numbers, click on your browser's File menu and choose "Save As". Give your file a name and under the option "Save as type" select "Text file."

To create the roll file:

  • Open WinCraps, click on the Action menu and choose Dice Roll Files
  • On the Dice Roll Files screen click on the File menu and select New/Open
  • Enter a name for your new roll file and click on OK
  • Click on the Edit menu and choose Paste From Text File
  • Enter the name of the text file you created when you collected the data.

That's it. Your rolls are now ready to play in WinCraps. You can add more rolls by repeating the process except instead of naming a new roll file, paste the rolls into your existing roll file. Remember that the rolls will be pasted in wherever the "Next Roll" is located in the dice roll file.

See question #29 below for instructions on collecting data from HotBits.




Question #18

How do I set the probability matrix to roll the dice with an SRR of 6.143?

Answer

SRR is a term used by many "dice-influencers" which stands for Sevens-Roll-Ratio and is simply a different way of expressing the probability of a seven. Normally the seven appears an average of once every six rolls and the probability is expressed as 1/6 = 16.67%. However, with SRR just the denominator is given, so the normal SRR is 6. A larger SRR value would mean that sevens are appearing less often and a smaller SRR value would mean that sevens are appearing more often.

There are several ways to enter an SRR of 6.143 into WinCraps' probability matrix. One way is to select the option: "Show as # rolls out of" (see item B circled in the diagram below) then enter 6.143 in the adjacent box and press the return key. All the figures you see in the matrix (next to cyan colored boxes) will be converted to ratios of rolls out of 6.143 with the value next to the 7 showing 1.024. Next you need to change the probability so that the number next to the 7 reads 1.000 (see item A below).

Of course, you could just enter 1.000 directly and you'd be done. However, it depends on how you think obtaining an SRR of 6.143 is possible. If, like many dice-influencers, you believe that the probability of the dice can be changed by throwing them such that they rotate about an axis, then you need to adjust the values at the bottom of the screen next to "1st Die" and "2nd Die" until the value next to the 7 reads 1.000. To really get this right you should keep opposite faces of each die (such as the 5-2) the same. This will ensure that the probabilities of the other numbers are also properly set. So for instance, for the 1-6 axis you would equally raise or lower the values next to the 1 and the 6. Using a little trial and error on both dice with various combinations of the three axes you should be able to find the values you need. You can make this a little easier by clicking the Option menu and selecting "Compute percentage dice about an axis" (see item C below). In the second diagram below you can see one example of dice axes and shooter's effectiveness that will result in an SRR of 6.143.

Another way to enter an SRR is to convert it into a normal expression of probablity and change the matrix to reflect that percentage. So to convert an SRR of 6.143, divide 1 by 6.143 and you'll find that the probability of the seven is 16.278%. Now simply select the option: "Show as percentage" and change the probabilities of the two dice until the value next to 7 reads 16.278. In all cases, remember to activate the probability matrix when you need it and deactivate it when you don't need it using auto-bets, hot-keys, or manually with the check box shown next to item D below.




Question #19

I have some auto-bet files written for WinCraps Classic that I opened in WinCraps Pro. I noticed that all the "While" statements got converted to "If" statements whereas the "When" statements got converted to "If" statements and were also retained as green comments. Why is that and do I need to do anything about it?

Answer

In WinCraps Classic, "When" and "While" both mark the beginning of conditional statements and so both are converted to the comparable "If" in WinCraps Pro. However, "When" performs an additional function which "If" does not and therefore "When" is retained as a comment to remind you to check the script to ensure that it functions as originally intended.

To review from the WinCraps Classic help file:

    Each condition block beginning with "When" will be considered true if:
    1) All conditions in the block are currently true, and
    2) At least one condition in the block was false before the most recent roll.

In other words, "When" provides the additional means to determine the moment that conditions become true. You can think of it as a trigger that's pulled when conditions become true but is not released and cannot be pulled again until conditions become false. Of course, you can do the same thing in WinCraps Pro but you have to provide the trigger yourself. For example, say that you'd like to count the number of times the shooter establishes a point of 6 and in WinCraps Classic you script the following:

When ...
        A point is established on the number 6
then ...
        Add $ 1 to Chip-Stack # 1

Using "When" allows you to increment your count only if the point 6 is established but was not established on the previous roll. So if a shooter rolls a hand of 6, 8, 10, 7 then Chip-Stack #1 will hold the correct value of 1. But what happens when this gets converted to WinCraps Pro?

If 'When
        A point is established on 6
Then
        Add $1 to CheckStack1
EndIf

This time following the same rolls, CheckStack1 will hold the incorrect value of 3. Why? Because the counter continues to increment as long as a point of 6 is established. So instead of the number of points established on 6, you'll have the number of rolls while a point is established on 6. What you need to do is incorporate the part of "When" which states that at least one condition in the block must have been false before the most recent roll. For example:

If
        A point is established on the number 6
        And Last roll was a comeout roll
Then
        Add $1 to CheckStack1
EndIf

This time CheckStack1 will show the correct value of 1.

In some cases, it might not matter whether the Classic script used a "When" or a "While" so you can just delete the green commented 'When.




Question #20

I have some auto-bet files written for WinCraps Classic which use flags. How do I convert these files to run in WinCraps Pro?

Answer

A flag is just a variable that can be assigned a value of true or false and then used in a logical argument. In WinCraps Pro flags have been merged with CheckStacks because CheckStacks (called ChipStacks in WinCraps Classic) are also variables and can also be assigned values of true and false. So, all you need to do is replace your flags with checkstacks. For example, say you have a classic script which contains the following two auto-bets:

While ...
        Bankroll is greater than $100
then ...
        Set flag "Double Up" to True
While ...
        Flag "Double Up" is True
then ...
        Bet $ 10 on Pass Line

When you open this script in WinCraps Pro, the syntax will be converted as follows:

If
        Bankroll is greater than $100
Then
        'flag "Double Up" to True
EndIf
If
        'flag "Double Up" is True
Then
        Bet $10 on Pass Line
EndIf

Notice how the flag statements have been deactivated with apostrophes thus turning them into comments (green text). Now decide which checkstack you want to use and replace the green text as follows:

If
        Bankroll is greater than $100
Then
        checkstack1 to True
EndIf
If
        checkstack1 is True
Then
        Bet $10 on Pass Line
EndIf

That's all there is to it. If you'd like to retain the name "Double Up" because it makes the script more readable, then you can just tack it onto the end of the checkstack name together with a period. You can also abbreviate the checkstack name and use an equal sign as follows:

If
        Bankroll is greater than $100
Then
        cs1.doubleup = True
EndIf
If
        cs1.doubleup = True
Then
        Bet $10 on Pass Line
EndIf




Question #21

I have a dice roll file that I want to save as a text file but in a different format than what the game provides. For example, for a 12 I want the file to show "6 6" and not "(6-6)". Can I do that?

Answer

Yes, of course! You can use an Auto-bet script to output the rolls in whatever format you want. In WinCraps Pro you could write:

If
        Initializing script
Then
        Open / clear file for output input$("Enter a name for your dice roll text file:") & ".txt"
Else
        Output to file Die1 & " " & Die2 & cr
EndIf

This will save all game rolls no matter what the source. So to create a text file from an existing roll file, you would open the dice roll file on the dice roll files screen, set the recorder to "Playback", return to the game table and start a new game. Run the hyper-drive to get through the roll file quickly.

In WinCraps Classic, you don't have quite as much flexibility but can still do a few things. For example:

While ...
        Initializing script
Then ...
        Open / clear file for output: "Rolls.txt"
Else ...
        Output to file. Value of die1
        Output to file. Value of die2
        Output to file. Newline.

Unfortunately, output can't be concatenated in the Classic version like it can in the Pro version, and you can't query for the output filename but rather need to enter it directly into the code (e.g. "Rolls.txt"). Furthermore, each item output will be followed by a tab character so your output will look like "6        6" rather than "6 6" but if your ultimate goal is to load the text file into a spreadsheet like Excel then the tab characters (together with the Newline command which is a carriage return) will cause the numbers to fall nicely into two separate columns. If you want this in the Pro code then just enter the word "Tab" such as: "Output to file Die1 & tab & Die2 & cr




Question #22

I'm writing an auto-bet script and I want to refer to a figure on the Bet Results screen. What I want is the total dollar amount won or lost on ALL bets of a shooter's hand. How can I do this? I tried the following and it didn't work:

checkstack1 = all(total $ net shooter bets current hand)

Answer

The keywords "Any" and "All" are used to define lists wherein items are individually evaluated and compared to something or set to something. In your case, you're not comparing or setting the items in the list, you're trying to set the value of checkstack1. But you can't just set it to a list of values - you have to set it to a sum of those values. For example:

checkstack1 = sum(total $ net shooter bets current hand)

Furthermore, while the above statement will correctly reference the shooter's net win/loss during his hand, you'll need to change it a bit if you want to reference his net win/loss at the end of his hand. Since a shooter's hand finishes when he/she seven's out, the dice will be passed and the statement above will reference the new shooter. So in this case you should change it to reference the "last shooter" and the "last hand". For example:

checkstack1 = sum(total $ net last shooter bets last hand)




Question #23

How do I take odds on my Come bets?

Answer

There are three ways to take odds on Come bets:

1) Select Auto-play from the Action menu and check the "Auto-take full odds" box (for the pro version, this setting will be applied to the players you've selected).

2) Manually take odds by clicking in the center of the point box on the table layout (for the pro version, be sure that the desired player is selected). In a casino, Come odds are placed on top of and slightly offset from the flat bet. In WinCraps, Come odds are also offset but always toward the center of the point box. For example, to take odds you would click anywhere in the yellow hatched area shown here:

3) Enter commands in your auto-bet script.

    To accomplish the same thing as option #1 above, you would write:

    AutoTake Full Odds = true

    However, you can also bet specific amounts of odds for each flat bet. For example, you could write:

    If
            Come4 is equal to 10
    Then
            Bet $20 on ComeOdds4
    EndIf

    Or you could write something a little more general:

    If
            Come4 is greater than 0
    Then
            Bet (2 * Come4) on ComeOdds4
    EndIf




Question #24

How do I write an auto-bet script that only makes two Come bets?

Answer

Well, what would you do at a real table? You would count them as you make them, right? You might keep track of the count in your head, make tick marks on a piece of paper, make a stack of $1 checks, or something similar. With auto-betting, you can easily keep track of a count like this using a checkstack. So at the place where your script makes a bet, you would add a line that says something like: Add 1 to checkstack1. You could also abbreviate checkstack1 to cs1 and add a comment to help yourself remember what it's for. For example: Add 1 to cs1.#comebets. Then include this count in the conditions that you use to make your Come bets. For example:

If
        A point is established
        And cs1.#comebets < 2
Then
        Bet $5 on Come :
        Add 1 to cs1.#comebets
EndIf

Once two Come bets have been made, the value of cs1.#comebets will become 2 thus rendering the conditions of the auto-bet false and preventing it from making any more Come bets. Now, did you really intend to make just two Come bets for the whole session? What if you want this betting scenario to repeat, say for every shooter? Then you'll need to reset your counter when the new shooter begins:

If
        New shooter
Then
        cs1.#comebets = 0
EndIf

Since you won't be making Come bets until the new shooter establishes a point, you can place these lines either before or after the previous lines. For WinCraps classic, the whole thing would look like this:

While ...
        The # of rolls for this shooter are equal to 0
Then ...
        Bet $0 on Chip-Stack #1
While ...
        A point is established
        Chip-Stack #1 is less than $2
Then ...
        Bet $5 on Come
        Add $ 1 to Chip-Stack #1

So far, we've only addressed the issue of making two Come bets. Either or both could win or lose on the first roll or become established on points. What if your objective is to establish and maintain two Come bets on points? Then you don't really need the checkstack since you can just count the bets on the table:

If
        A point is established
        And count(come bets) < 2
Then
        Bet $5 on Come
EndIf



Question #25

How do I write auto-bet code to determine if a number is even?

Answer

There are several ways to determine if a number is even. One is to divide the number by two and compare it to the integer of the same number divided by two:

If dice total / 2 = int(dice total / 2) Then show message "dice total is even" EndIf

Instead of using "int" as above, you could use a backslash for integer division:

If # of rolls / 2 = # of rolls \ 2 Then show message "# of rolls is even" EndIf

Another option is to use modular arithmetic:

If checkstack9 mod 2 = 0 Then show message "checkstack9 is even" EndIf

In this case, "mod" divides the number by 2 and returns the remainder. If the remainder is 0 then the number was evenly divisible by 2.

Unfortunately, integer conversion and modulus arithmetic are unavailable in the classic version. However, you can use the "Round" function instead. For example:

Do this ...
        Bet 100% of Chip-Stack #1 on Chip-Stack #2
        Round Chip-Stack #2 to the nearest $2
While ...
        Chip-Stack #1 is equal to Chip-Stack #2
Then ...
        Show message: "Chip-Stack #1 is even"



Question #26

I've configured my WinCraps Pro table with several players and assigned each of them an auto-bet script. Two of the scripts contain the "Pass the dice" command, yet one of the players still ends up shooting the dice. How can that be?

Answer

This has to do with the order of script processing. Remember that (except for initialization) auto-betting takes place AFTER the dice roll and that scripts are processed beginning with Player1 (in the upper-left position as viewed by the stickperson) and proceeding counter-clockwise to Player8.

So for example, let's say Player1 and Player2 both have scripts with "Pass the dice" commands. Player3 is the shooter and sevens-out. Winning and losing bets are processed first and then the dice are passed clockwise to Player2. NOW the auto-bet scripts are processed.

Player1's script is processed first. His script says to "Pass the dice", but since he doesn't have the dice, his command is ignored (unless he was given permission to pass the dice for other players).

Next, Player2's script is processed. It also says to "Pass the dice" and since he does have the dice, he faithfully passes them to Player1. Since Player1's script has already been processed, he gladly accepts the dice and shoots. Player1 will only pass the dice if his script executes the "Pass the dice" command again on a subsequent roll.

So how do you prevent Player1 from shooting at all? You should use the AutoPass feature. The "Pass the dice" command is best reserved for those times when a player already has the dice before his script is processed, like when he's been shooting but doesn't want to finish his hand. The AutoPass feature on the other hand, operates independently from auto-bet script processing and will ensure that Player1 always passes the dice whenever he's offered to be the shooter.

You can either check the box "Auto-pass the dice" directly on the Auto-Play screen or you can enter the following line in your auto-bet script:

AutoPass the dice = true



Question #27

How do I write an auto-bet which doubles a place bet every other win?

Answer

One way to do something at set intervals (such as every other time) is to use a checkstack to count the events and take action when it reaches the desired number of events. You can then reset the checkstack to zero and start the count over. For example:

If place6 wins Then
        add 1 to checkstack1
        If checkstack1 = 2 Then
                bet last $ place6 *2 on place6 :
                checkstack1 = 0
        EndIf
EndIf

To make the same bet every third win, just change the test to "If checkstack1 = 3"

Instead of using checkstacks, another option is to use the number of place bet wins (from the bet results screen) together with the "mod" operator. For example:

If place6 wins Then
        If total # place6 wins mod 2 = 0 Then
                bet last $ place6 *2 on place6 :
        EndIf
EndIf

The "mod" operator (as mentioned in question #25 above) divides the value in question by the mod amount and returns the remainder. If the remainder is 0 then the value was evenly divisible. This works great for other frequencies too. For example, to double the bet every 3rd win, you would use "mod 3", for every fourth win use "mod 4", etc.

Repeating this code for each desired Place bet will make them all operate independently. If you want to make them all work together such that every other win on the combined Place bets would cause the winning Place bet to double, you could write something like this:

If any(place bets win) Then
        add 1 to checkstack1
        If checkstack1 = 2 Then
                bet last $ place(dice total) *2 on place(dice total) :
                checkstack1 = 0
        EndIf
EndIf

Here's a script called regress n press inside-out which uses some of these concepts.



Question #28

Where can I find the average number of rolls to resolve a point?

Answer

In WinCraps Pro look at the Hands screen and in WinCraps Classic look at the Summary screen:

Assuming that you want the average number of rolls to resolve points after they've become established then simply take the total number of rolls minus the total number of come-out rolls and divide by the total number of points:

    (100,000 - 29,549) / 19,746 = 3.5679

To be absolutely precise you would need to ensure that the table didn't have a currently unresolved point. Also bear in mind that this answer strictly applies to the actual rolls you've experienced at the table (in this case 100,000). The theoretical average number of rolls to resolve a point is 3.5636.

If you want some WinCraps Pro auto-bet code to do this for you, you can use this:

    cs1.avgrolls2resolvepoint = (# of rolls - # of comeout rolls) / # of points

In WinCraps Classic you can use this (chip-stack #3 holds the answer):

    When ...
            A point is established on any number
    then ...
            Add $ 1 to Chip-Stack # 1
    While ...
            Last roll was NOT a come-out roll
    then ...
            Add $ 1 to Chip-Stack # 2
    Do this ...
            Bet 100 % of Chip-Stack # 2 on Chip-Stack # 3
            Divide by 100 % of Chip-Stack # 1 on Chip-Stack # 3

If instead you wanted the average number of rolls to both establish and resolve a point then you would simply divide the total number of rolls by the total number of points established:

    100,000 / 19,746 = 5.064



Question #29

How do I collect random data from HotBits and use it to create a roll file to play on WinCraps?

Answer

To collect the data:

  • Navigate to HotBits request page
  • At the top of the page enter the number of bytes requested (there's a max of 2048)
  • Under Format, select "Hexadecimal"
  • Click on the button titled, "Get HotBits"
  • When you get the numbers, click on your browser's File menu and choose "Save As". Give your file a name and under the option "Save as type" select "Text file."

To create the roll file:

  • Open WinCraps, click on the Action menu and choose Dice Roll Files
  • On the Dice Roll Files screen click on the File menu and select New/Open
  • Enter a name for your new roll file and click on OK
  • Click on the Edit menu and choose Paste From Text File
  • Enter the name of the text file you created when you collected the data.

That's it. Your rolls are now ready to play in WinCraps. You can add more rolls by repeating the process except instead of naming a new roll file, paste the rolls into your existing roll file. Remember that the rolls will be pasted in wherever the "Next Roll" is located in the dice roll file.

Note that only the numbers 1 thru 6 are used for dice rolls so typically a request of 2000 hexadecimal numbers will only produce approximately 700 dice rolls.

See question #17 above for instructions on collecting data from Random.org.





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This page was last updated Jun 16, 2017
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